AF – the new epidemic of the society

7:03 am Health Care

The prevalence and incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing globally. In total, 0.5% of the world’s population has AF and it has become the new global epidemic.

In a study, published online December 17, 2013 in the journal Circulation, Dr Sumeet Chugh at Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles analyzed the numbers from the Global Burden of Disease database. The AF review included 184 studies, one–third of which were conducted in North America and another one-third in Western Europe.

In 1990, the estimated AF prevalence rate per 100 000 individuals was 569.5 in males and 359.9 in females; this increased to 596.2 in males and 373.1 in females in 2010.
In 1990, the overall incidence of AF per 100 000 individuals was 60.7 in males and 43.8 in females; by 2010, this incidence of AF increased to 77.5 in males and 59.5 in females.
Over the 20–year period, the age-adjusted mortality rate for AF increased twofold in men and women. By 2010, the age–adjusted mortality rate per 100 000 individuals was 1.6 and 1.7 for men and women, respectively.
Disability associated with AF also increased significantly from 1990 to 2010, with investigators observing an 18% increase in disability–adjusted life–years (DALYs) per 100 000 individuals.
In 1990, the estimated AF prevalence rate per 100 000 individuals was 569.5 in males and 359.9 in females; this increased to 596.2 in males and 373.1 in females in 2010.
In 1990, the overall incidence of AF per 100 000 individuals was 60.7 in males and 43.8 in females; by 2010, this incidence of AF increased to 77.5 in males and 59.5 in females.
Over the 20–year period, the age–adjusted mortality rate for AF increased twofold in men and women. By 2010, the age–adjusted mortality rate per 100 000 individuals was 1.6 and 1.7 for men and women, respectively.
Disability associated with AF also increased significantly from 1990 to 2010, with investigators observing an 18% increase in disability–adjusted life–years (DALYs) per 100 000 individuals.

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