Our Editor In Chief Dr KK Aggarwal Takes over As Senior Vice President of Indian Medical Association

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Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India took over as National Senior Vice President of Indian Medical Association for the year 2014. Dr Jitender B Patel from Ahmadabad took over as the President.

Dr. Aggarwal is Padma Shri and Dr. BC Roy National Awardee and a Senior Consultant, Physician and Cardiologist at Moolchand Medcity. In the past Dr. Aggarwal has served as the Head of Research wing and Academic wing of IMA and also Finance Secretary of IMA.

He has also served as President of Delhi Medical Association and President IMA. He also served as President IMA Delhi branch three times.

Dr. Aggarwal is known for his innovative low cost health awareness modules. In three of his conceptualized events National Commemorative Postal Stamps have been released.

Firstly in 1991, Run for your Heart and secondly in 1993 Perfect Health Mela, on both the occasions Government of India released postal stamps. In 2012 Government of Rajasthan released cancellation stamp on organizing first ever mega health check-up camp at Ajmer.

Dr. Aggarwal was also the first one to have start Clot Dissolving Therapy in acute heart attack in India and also to have started Color Doppler Echocardiography in North India.

The team changed at Rajahmundry Andhra Pradesh at the central council meeting of IMA.

2013 Research Highlights

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Malaria vaccine found safe and protective

NIH researchers reported that a candidate malaria vaccine is safe and protected against infection in an early–stage clinical trial.

Gene variants predict response to breast cancer drugs

An international research team, with NIH support, found genetic variations that can be used to identify women who are most likely to benefit from this potentially life–saving strategy—and who should avoid it.

Urine test detects kidney transplant rejection

NIH–funded researchers found that certain molecules in urine can provide an early sign of transplant rejection. The test could allow doctors to act early to protect transplanted kidneys.

Technique directs immune cells to target leukemia

An NIH–funded team used a type of targeted immunotherapy to induce remission in 5 patients with this aggressive form of leukemia.

Medical management best to prevent second stroke

An NIH–funded clinical trial confirmed earlier findings that stenting adds no benefits over aggressive medical treatment alone for most of these patients.

Duration of obesity may affect heart disease

NIH researchers found that how long a young adult is obese may affect that person’s heart disease risk in middle age. The finding suggests that not only preventing but also delaying the onset of obesity can help reduce heart disease later in life.

AF – the new epidemic of the society

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The prevalence and incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing globally. In total, 0.5% of the world’s population has AF and it has become the new global epidemic.

In a study, published online December 17, 2013 in the journal Circulation, Dr Sumeet Chugh at Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles analyzed the numbers from the Global Burden of Disease database. The AF review included 184 studies, one–third of which were conducted in North America and another one-third in Western Europe.

In 1990, the estimated AF prevalence rate per 100 000 individuals was 569.5 in males and 359.9 in females; this increased to 596.2 in males and 373.1 in females in 2010.
In 1990, the overall incidence of AF per 100 000 individuals was 60.7 in males and 43.8 in females; by 2010, this incidence of AF increased to 77.5 in males and 59.5 in females.
Over the 20–year period, the age-adjusted mortality rate for AF increased twofold in men and women. By 2010, the age–adjusted mortality rate per 100 000 individuals was 1.6 and 1.7 for men and women, respectively.
Disability associated with AF also increased significantly from 1990 to 2010, with investigators observing an 18% increase in disability–adjusted life–years (DALYs) per 100 000 individuals.
In 1990, the estimated AF prevalence rate per 100 000 individuals was 569.5 in males and 359.9 in females; this increased to 596.2 in males and 373.1 in females in 2010.
In 1990, the overall incidence of AF per 100 000 individuals was 60.7 in males and 43.8 in females; by 2010, this incidence of AF increased to 77.5 in males and 59.5 in females.
Over the 20–year period, the age–adjusted mortality rate for AF increased twofold in men and women. By 2010, the age–adjusted mortality rate per 100 000 individuals was 1.6 and 1.7 for men and women, respectively.
Disability associated with AF also increased significantly from 1990 to 2010, with investigators observing an 18% increase in disability–adjusted life–years (DALYs) per 100 000 individuals.

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