Walking 2000 steps extra lower cardiovascular risk

Health Care Comments Off

Walking 20 minutes at a moderate pace each day is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes in patients with impaired glucose tolerance, according to a study in The Lancet.

People who walked 2,000 steps more per day at baseline had a 10% lower risk of cardiovascular death, paralysis or heart attack during an average follow–up of 6 years according to Thomas Yates, PhD, of the University of Leicester in England, and colleagues.

And those who increased the amount they walked by 2,000 steps per day from baseline to 1 year had a similar reduction in risk of cardiovascular events.

The findings from NAVIGATOR trial support both the promotion of increased ambulatory activity, and the avoidance of decreased ambulatory activity irrespective of the starting level, as important targets in the prevention of chronic disease.

Eat 20 almonds or 15 cashews or 30 peanuts every day

Health Care Comments Off

People who ate a 1–ounce serving of nuts each day showed a 20 percent reduced risk of dying from any cause over three decades, compared to those who didn’t eat the tasty snacks, as shown a study published in the Nov. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine by Dr. Charles Fuchs, director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Center at the Dana–Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

Prior studies suPeople who ate a 1–ounce serving of nuts each day showed a 20 percent reduced risk of dying from any cause over three decades, compared to those who didn’t eat the tasty snacks, as shown a study published in the Nov. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine by Dr. Charles Fuchs, director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Center at the Dana–Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

Prior studies suggest health benefits like a lower risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes and lower cholesterol, among other health outcomes. Nuts are nutrient-dense foods. They contain unsaturated fatty acids, fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

One–ounce serving was equal to about 16 to 24 almonds, 16 to 18 cashews or 30 to 35 peanuts.ggest health benefits like a lower risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes and lower cholesterol, among other health outcomes. Nuts are nutrient-dense foods. They contain unsaturated fatty acids, fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

One–ounce serving was equal to about 16 to 24 almonds, 16 to 18 cashews or 30 to 35 peanuts.

Tobacco, drug use in pregnancy can double risk of stillbirth

Health Care Comments Off

Smoking tobacco or marijuana, taking prescription painkillers, or using illegal drugs during pregnancy is associated with double or even triple the risk of stillbirth, according to research funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Researchers based their findings on measurements of the chemical byproducts of nicotine in maternal blood samples; and cannabis, prescription painkillers and other drugs in umbilical cords. Taking direct measurements provided more precise information than did previous studies of stillbirth and substance use that relied only on women’s self–reporting. The study findings appear in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

“Smoking is a known risk factor for stillbirth, but this analysis gives us a much clearer picture of the risks than before,” said senior author Uma M. Reddy, M.D., MPH, of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the NIH institute that supported the study. “Additionally, results from the latest findings also showed that likely exposure to secondhand smoke can elevate the risk of stillbirth.” Stillbirth occurs when a fetus dies at or after 20 weeks of gestation.

The researchers tested the women’s blood for cotinine, a derivative of nicotine, and tested fetal umbilical cords for evidence of several types of drugs. They looked for evidence of the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine; prescription painkillers, such as morphine and codeine, and marijuana. These tests reflect exposure late in pregnancy. Among the women who had experienced a stillbirth, more than 80 percent showed no traces of cotinine and 93 percent tested negative for the other drugs. In comparison, about 90 percent of women who gave birth to a live infant tested tobacco–free and 96 percent tested negative for other drugs.

Based on the blood test results and women’s own responses, the researchers calculated the increased risk of stillbirth for each of the substances they examined:

  • Tobacco use — 1.8 to 2.8 times greater risk of stillbirth, with the highest risk found among the heaviest smokers
  • Marijuana use — 2.3 times greater risk of stillbirth
  • Evidence of any stimulant, marijuana or prescription painkiller use — 2.2 times greater risk of stillbirth
  • Passive exposure to tobacco — 2.1 times greater risk of stillbirth

The researchers noted that they could not entirely separate the effects of smoking tobacco from those of smoking marijuana.

Only a small number of women tested positive for prescription painkiller use, but there was a trend towards an association of these drugs with an elevated stillbirth risk.

« Previous Entries