High fat diet is prostate cancer prone

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Diets high in saturated fat increases the risk of prostate cancer, according to a report from University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston published in the International Journal of Cancer.

  • Men who consume high saturated animal fat diet are two times more likely to experience disease progression after prostate cancer surgery than men with lower saturated fat intake.
  • There is also shorter “disease–free” survival time among obese men who eat high saturated fat diet compared with non–obese men consuming diets low in saturated fat.
  • Men with a high saturated fat intake had the shortest survival time free of prostate cancer (19 months)
  • Non–obese men with low fat intake survived the longest time free of the disease (46 months).
  • Non–obese men with high intake and obese men with low intake had “disease–free” survival of 29 and 42 months, respectively.

Take home messages

  • High saturated fat diet has been linked to cancer of the prostate
  • Reducing saturated fat in the diet after prostate cancer surgery can help reduce the cancer progression.
  • Cancer prostate has the same risk factors as that of heart blockages and both are linked to high saturated fat intake.
  • With the increase of heart patients, a corresponding increase in prostate cancer patients is also seen in the society

ABO Blood Type is a Risk Factor for Coronary Heart Disease

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Two prospective cohort studies have identified the ABO blood group as a risk factor for the development of heart disease. People with blood groups A, B, or AB were 5–23% more likely to develop coronary heart disease compared with those with O blood type. The study by Dr Meian He from Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA included 62 073 women from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and 27 428 men from the Health Professionals Follow–up Study (HPFS) and is published in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

In the NHS and HPFS, the incident rates of coronary heart disease per 100 000 person–years were 125, 128, 142, and 161 for women with type O, A, B, and AB, respectively, and 373, 382, 387, and 524 for men with type O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Compared with individuals with O blood type, individuals with blood group A, B, or AB had a respective 5%, 11%, and 23% increased risk of developing coronary heart disease in an age–adjusted model.

In non–O individuals, plasma levels of factor VIII–von Willebrand factor (vWF) are approximately 25% higher than in individuals with type O blood type. Elevated levels of factor VIII–vWF have been previously identified as a risk factor for coronary heart disease. The vWF has an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis by mediating platelet adhesion to the vascular wall, especially under high shear stress conditions.

Natural foods and not supplements prevent heart disease

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One should take seasonal and locally grown natural foods and vegetables grown out of organic farms. Eat less, dinner lighter then lunch, eat natural and in moderation– are few of the mantras.

Eating food supplements can be harmful. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamin E, either alone or in combination with each other or other antioxidant vitamins does not prevent heart disease.

High dose vitamin E supplementation (400 IU/day) may be associated with an increase in all–cause mortality.

Supplementation with vitamin C does not prevent a second heart attack.

Beta carotene supplementation may be dangerous and should be discouraged.

Vitamin E supplementation may be of benefit for only secondary prevention in heart patients with chronic renal failure who are undergoing hemodialysis.

The AHA concluded that current data do not justify the use of antioxidant supplements for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular disease risk.

The above recommendations apply to supplementation only. Diets that are rich in natural antioxidants are associated with lower cardiovascular mortality.

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