Learning CPR is real voluntary work, Dr K K Aggarwal

Health Care, Heart Care Foundation of India, Medicine No Comments

Youth festival held at Delhi’s Zakir Hussain college highlighted the importance of this technique

New Delhi, 21st February 2018: A survey conducted by an online doctor consultation platform indicates that about 98% of the country’s population is not trained in the basic life-saving technique of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). CPR is the most crucial and basic procedure to save a life in the event of a sudden cardiac arrest.

In line with this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Immediate Past National President Indian Medical Association (IMA), gave a comprehensive talk at the Youth Festival held in Zakir Hussain College, New Delhi. Dr Aggarwal is a Gold Medallist and Limca Book of record holder in CPR 10.

Speaking about CPR and the need for it, Dr K K Aggarwal, who is also the Vice President of CMAAO, said, “Zakir Hussain college should aim to become the first college in the city with 100% CPR training of all the students. Learning this technique amounts to real voluntary work as doctors may not be able to reach the victim within the first 10 minutes. It, therefore, becomes the duty and responsibility of bystanders to save lives. All students under the banner of NSS should also learn CPR.”

Other dignitaries present at the event included Mr Sulekh Chandra, Principal, Zakir Hussain College; Mr Mukesh Kumar Jain, Associate Professor, Zakir Hussain College; and Dr Virendra Mishra, Director, Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan.

Adding further, Dr Virendra Mishra, said, “The two pillars of community service include meaningful engagement and mindful participation. Learning the basics of CPR is community service at its best as it can help avert mortality through timely assistance, before medical help arrives.”

The CPR 10 Mantra is as follows: Within 10 minutes of cardiac arrest (earlier the better) for the next 10 minutes at least, compress the centre of the chest with a speed of 100 compressions per minute (10×10)”. CPR 10 is easy to learn and easy to do and one does not need to be a doctor or be certified in this technique to do CPR.

Treat every TB case and trace all close contacts

Health Care, Heart Care Foundation of India, Medicine No Comments

Testing for latent TB should be performed in asymptomatic individuals

New Delhi, 20th February 2018: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in India with the country having the largest number of TB cases in the world. Over a quarter of the global TB and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) burden is in India. Statistics from USAID indicate that in 2016, 2.79 million people became ill from TB, and 435,000 died from it.

Testing for latent TB should be performed in asymptomatic individuals. High-priority groups for evaluation include close contacts of TB patients.

Close contact is defined as individuals with at least four hours of contact per week. This includes those living in the same household or frequent visitors to the house or contacts at work or school.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Immediate Past National President Indian Medical Association (IMA), said, “The risk of developing active disease is very high in the years following exposure and new infection. It is imperative to evaluate close contacts first and expand the contact investigation to casual contacts if evidence of transmission is found. Casual contact is defined as individuals with less than four hours of contact per week. This may include health care workers and/or contacts at work or school. Evidence of transmission is defined by a secondary active case or positive Mantoux test. In general, source cases with positive sputum smear are more contagious. Casual contacts of smear-negative patients are usually not evaluated unless they are immunocompromised.”

If the first test is negative, close contacts of patients with active pulmonary TB should undergo a second test eight weeks later. The risk of disease in the first two years following infection is age dependent.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, who is also Vice President of CMAAO, said, “Health care workers should undergo pre-exposure baseline testing prior to employment, followed by subsequent annual testing. Conversion of a Mantoux from negative to positive indicates new infection. Approximately half of the lifetime risk of reactivation occurs in the first one to two years following infection, and thus, it is important to target those who convert their Mantoux for treatment. A two-step Mantoux protocol should be followed (ie, if the first Mantoux is negative, then a second Mantoux is performed within one to four weeks). For the Mantoux, conversion is defined as a new positive test (with an increase of ≥10 mm) in the size of the Mantoux reaction compared with the previous two years.”

The decline of risk with increasing age reflects greater innate and acquired immunity: Infants (ages ≤1 year): 50 percent; Children (ages 1 to 2 years): 12 to 25 percent; Children (ages 2 to 5 years): 5 percent; Children (ages 5 to 10 years): 2 percent and Age >10 years: 1 to 2 percent.

The purpose of notification of Tb is the trace the close and casual contacts.

Safe disposal of medical waste is a must

Health Care, Heart Care Foundation of India, Medicine No Comments

This is not just at the hospital level but also in our homes

New Delhi, 19th February 2018: A recent survey by ASSOCHAM has indicated that about 5,900 tonnes of bio-medical waste is generated in Delhi and NCR (national capital region) alone, with the share of Delhi alone being roughly about 2,200 tonnes. NCR, consisting of Noida/Greater Noida, creates 1,200 tonnes of bio-medical waste and Gurugram produces 1,100 tonnes of such waste, while Ghaziabad’s share is estimated at around 800 tonnes.

This situation is made worse by the fact that most of this waste remains untreated and dumped with municipal waste causing serious health and environmental hazard.

Bio-medical waste means any waste, which is generated during the diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human beings or animals or in research activities pertaining thereto or in the production or testing of biologicals.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Immediate Past National President Indian Medical Association (IMA), said, “Untreated hospital waste can pose major risks to those who may come into contact with it. These risks include AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome), Hepatitis B and C, gastroenteric infections, respiratory infections, blood stream infections, skin infections, effects of radioactive substances, and intoxication. Waste management is an integral part of a hospital’s hygiene and maintenance activities. In fact, only 15% of hospital waste, that is, ‘Bio-medical waste’ is hazardous. However, when hazardous waste is not segregated at the source of generation and mixed with nonhazardous waste, then 100% waste becomes hazardous.”

Segregation is the essence of waste management and should be done at the source of generation of Bio-medical waste e.g. all patient care activity areas, diagnostic services areas, operation theaters, labour rooms, treatment rooms etc.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, who is also the Group Editor of IJCP, said, “Safe medical waste disposal is imperative not just in large establishments but also at home. One should have a medical waste disposal box at home, and these can be easily obtained from companies catering to this area, and some of them even offer a pick-up service.”

Some things to be considered include:

  • Use only disposable syringes. After use throw the syringes after breaking them in coloured bags.
  • Bandages, cotton and other blood-stained materials should not be thrown with general garbage.
  • Use coloured black plastic bags to dispose biomedical wastes.
  • Keep trash out of reach of small children and infants.
  • Diapers, Sanitary napkins etc. should also be disposed separately.
  • Drugs that are past date of expiry must never be used and properly disposed.
  • Use yellow bags for Infectious material, red bags for syringes, catherters, blue bags for Broken glass and black Cardboarad Box for Needles

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