India has the highest number of TB patients across the world

Health Care, Heart Care Foundation of India, Medicine No Comments

Missing doses can defeat the purpose of DOTS therapy

New Delhi, 12 December 2017: According to recent reports, with 2.79 million cases, 4.23 lakh deaths, and an average of 211 new infections diagnosed per 100,000 people, India currently has the highest number of tuberculosis (TB) patients across the globe. India also has the most number of MDR-TB patients in the world as well as the largest number of ‘missing’ TB patients. There are several million who have not been identified, notified, or treated and these people remain off radar.

TB is a highly infectious disease cured by providing proper medication at the right time for the full duration of the treatment. The drug regimen is called DOTS and is provided free under the Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP). It is based on the principle that a regular and uninterrupted supply of high-quality anti-TB drugs must be administered to cure the disease and prevent the occurrence of the MDR-TB.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, National President Indian Medical Association (IMA) and President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Dr RN Tandon – Honorary Secretary General IMA in a joint statement, said, “TB is a major public health concern in India. Not only is it a major cause of morbidity and mortality but also poses a huge economic burden on the country. Elimination, which is defined as restricting new infections to less than one case per 100,000 people, is possible only when patients get diagnosed and cured without any break in treatment. Any interruption in treatment can exponentially raise the patient’s risk of developing MDR-TB, which is harder to treat. Missing doses defeats the very purpose of DOTS therapy, which is meant to ensure strict compliance through supervised consumption of medicines. As many as 900,000 people with TB do not have access to proper treatment, which means they risk developing drug-resistant TB and infecting others.”

Reporting is important to trace contacts of the person with infectious TB. All contacts of the patient should be screened for TB and put on treatment if required. This cascade of screening of contacts, at home and workplace, identifies individuals at risk and prevents further spread of TB, including MDR TB.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, said, “The approach to all notifiable diseases should be based on DTR: Diagnose, Treat, and Report. Diagnose early, using sputum Gene Xpert test; Treat: Complete and effective treatment based on national guidelines, using FDC; and Report: Mandatory reporting.”

Here are some tips that can help avoid TB infection from spreading.

  • Wash your hands after sneezing, coughing or holding your hands near your mouth or nose.
  • Cover your mouth with a tissue when you cough, sneeze or laugh. Discard used tissues in a plastic bag, then seal and throw it away.
  • Do not attend work or school.
  • Avoid close contact with others.
  • Sleep in a room away from other family members.
  • Ventilate your room regularly. TB spreads in small closed spaces. Put a fan in your window to blow out air that may contain bacteria.

The Indian Medical Association announces bold steps aimed at restoring faith in doctors and the medical profession

Health Care, Medicine, Social Health Community No Comments

Proposes certain self-regulatory procedures for doctors and hospitals to adopt

New Delhi, 11 December 2017: The Indian Medical Association (IMA), the largest voluntary organization of Doctors of Modern Scientific Medicine today announced certain self-regulation procedures for hospitals and doctors. This comes in light of the recent incidents involving the lives of a pair of twins, and a 7-year-old girl. The doctor-patient trust in the country, which was already experiencing a downward spiral, has deteriorated further. Doctors, hospitals, the health industry, patients, media, and politicians all are unhappy. Doctors do not have the intent to be the cause for public unrest or loss of public trust. At the same time patients must understand that to err is human and one incident does not mean that there will be more such cases in future as well.

Trust is the foundation of a doctor and patient relationship. The medical profession is undergoing certain changes. While violence against doctors is on the rise and they are being held accountable, at times, for deeds not committed, it is also true that there is some introspection needed on the part of doctors and hospitals, failing which this trust may take a long time to reestablish. Today, the private sector looks after 80% of the patients that too with highest quality. In the absence of state subsidy private sector providing quality care  invariably will come at a cost which is still at fraction of a cost compared to that in advanced countries.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, National President Indian Medical Association (IMA) and President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Dr RN Tandon – Honorary Secretary General IMA in a joint statement, said, “We represent the collective consciousness of the largest medical association of modern doctors of the country, the IMA. A profession, which has been considered as second to none, & it will remain noble is today, being looked at with suspicion. However, the medical profession is the noblest profession. It is disheartening to see the erosion in trust and we want to make it more transparent. IMA is and will continue to work towards improving doctor-patient relationship. IMA is committed to practicing with humility and pledges to reform the existing system. We will also take the opportunity to say here that the doctor to patient ratio in India is skewed due to which doctors are under a lot of stress. Doctors are also human beings and not healing angels. Once treatment is administered, the recuperation of a patient depends upon physical and organic factors. It is unacceptable and absurd to victimize the medical practitioner if the patient does not respond to treatment.”

All doctors shall practice with compassion and follow IMA ALERT policy (Acknowledge, Listen in detail, Explain, Review and Thank you). The IMA has also announced formation of an IMA Medical Redressal Commission at the state level (in each state) to engage in social, financial, and quality audits of health care (Suo moto or on demand). The commission will have a public man, an IMA office bearer, one former state medical council representative, and two subject experts. The commission shall consider every grievance in a time bound manner. An appeal to the state commission will be heard by the “Head-quarters IMA Medical Redressal Commission” which will have the powers to take suo moto cases also. The headquarters shall also suggest reforms in healthcare on periodic basis.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, said, “What happened was most unfortunate. However, not all doctors are wrong, and the public must have faith in them. Such errors happen by accident and not intentionally. Having said this, it is also time for the medical profession to introspect and come out with self-regulation procedures. We are often blamed for prescribing costly drugs. From today onwards, all doctors in the country shall choose affordable drugs. We also appeal to the government to come out with an urgent ordinance for one drug-one company-one price policy. Doctors should actively participate in ensuring that no hospital sells any item priced higher than the MRP. No service charges should be added to procure drugs from outside. MRP shall not be dictated by the purchaser.”

The other points announced by IMA are as follows.

  • IMA recommends that all doctors should prescribe preferably NLEM drugs.
  • All doctors shall promote Janaushidhi Kendras.
  • We appeal to the government to classify all disposables under both NLEM and non-NLEM categories and cap the price of essential ones. Till then all medical establishments should sell the disposables at procurement prize after adding a predefined fixed margin.
  • Hospitals and doctors are often blamed of overcharging and over investigations. Billing should be transparent, and all special investigations should be well informed & explained.
  • Every doctor should ensure that it becomes mandatory on the part of the hospital administrator to give options at the time of admission to choose cost-effective treatment room and treatment (single room, sharing room, and general-ward) and explain the difference in total bill estimates.
  • All doctors should ensure that hospital estimates at the time of admission are near to actual.
  • The treating doctor must explain the chances of death and unexpected complications and resultant financial implication at the time of admission.
  • Once doctors take charge of a patient, the patient should not be neglected. They should look after the patient till discharge.
  • Emergency care is the responsibility of the state government and the government should subsidize the costs of all emergencies in private sector & create a mechanism for reimbursement.
  • Every medical prescription must include counseling on the cost of drugs and investigations.
  • IMA has zero tolerance to doctors indulging in female feticide.
  • IMA has zero tolerance to cuts and commissions. Medical establishment should revisit their referral fee system. Billing paid to doctors should be transparent and reflected in the bill.
  • No hospital can force their consultants to work on targets. Contractual agreements should be in such way in which of both parties that is consultant and the hospital is equally protected. All hospitals should consider not charging service charges from the consultants.
  • Choice of drugs and devices rests with the doctors based on the affordability of the patient and not on the profitability.
  • All hospitals must comply to the commitment towards EWS, BPL, and poor patients without any discrimination.
  • All patient complaints should be addressed in a timely manner through an internal redressal mechanism with a chairman from outside the hospital.
  • All medical establishments must ensure that their business ethics comply with the MCI ETHICS.
  • IMA LAMA policy is being developed as there are no clear guidelines at present.
  • Every dead body needs to be treated with respect and dignity.
  • All charitable hospitals should do their free work as assigned.
  • All needy patients must be routed through the social worker of the establishment and guided and directed to the appropriate place.
  • At least one more equally experienced but unrelated surgeon should be involved in the consent form during elective LSCS.
  • The patient has a right to get medical records within 72 hours of request. Acknowledge their request.
  • The patient has the right to go for a second opinion from an appropriately qualified medical doctor. The primary doctors have should not  get offended.
  • A hospital has no right to stop life-saving investigations or treatment for non-payment of bills if the patient is still admitted in the hospital. The government should make a mechanism for the reimbursement for the above for poor patients.
  • Ensure for us all are equal. BPL, APL, EWS, rich, or poor all should get the same attention and treatment.
  • IMA policy: With no National Guidelines on viability of fetus issue ,it is being looked upon by IMA, FOGSI, IAP and NNF.
  • We are not against any regulations and accountability, but we should all ask for a single window accountability at the state level. The state medical council should be proactive and take timely decisions. We should also ensure a single window registration.
  • We must ensure that our establishment has a transgender policy.
  • All government hospitals should be upgraded and have facilities like those in the private hospitals. All public, private or charitable hospitals should have quality accreditation.
  • No doctors should issue false certificates.

“All the above will & should be implemented with immediate effect”, said Dr Ravi Wankhedkar, National President Elect IMA, in his message.

The above have approval from most stakeholders. A copy of this is being sent to the Health Secretary, Govt of India and Health Minister, Govt of Delhi. Both President and Registrar, Delhi Medical Council, are requested to help in circulating this message to all doctors in Delhi.

We are thankful to the society for raising the issues and will request them to work with the medical fraternity to make IMAs project “Cure in India” a success.

Long-term use of statins can exacerbate the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes

Health Care No Comments

Long-term use of statins can exacerbate the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes

Healthy diet and lifestyle changes can prevent complications

New Delhi, 10 December 2017:A recent study has indicated that those indulging in the long-term use of cholesterol-lowering drug, statin, are at 30% more at risk of developing Type-2 diabetes. It mentions that taking statin is associated with a 36% heightened risk of subsequently being diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes. Research also indicates that statins may impair the production of insulin, the hormone needed to lower the body’s levels of blood glucose.

Estimates place the number of people living with diabetes at 60 million in India, of which 95% have Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is typically brought on by poor eating habits, too much weight and too little exercise. This condition, when poorly controlled, can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, blindness, and even kidney failure.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, National President Indian Medical Association (IMA) and President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Dr RN Tandon – Honorary Secretary General IMA in a joint statement, said, “In a person with Type 2 diabetes, the body does not utilize insulin properly and this condition is called as insulin resistance. The pancreas first makes extra insulin to make up for this. However, over time, it cannot make enough to keep the blood glucose at normal levels. While the exact trigger for this condition is not known, Type 2 diabetes could be a result of a combination of factors. Some may be genetically predisposed to the condition. People with a family history of obesity are also at an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and diabetes. Those who are obese have added pressure on their body’s ability to use insulin in controlling blood sugar levels. This can lead to Type 2 diabetes. The more fatty tissue a person has, the more resistant their cells become to insulin. Lifestyle factors also have a major role to play.”

The symptoms of Type 2 diabetes develop slowly, over a period of time. Some of them include increased thirst and hunger, frequent urination, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow healing of infections and wounds, and skin darkening in certain areas.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, said, “A healthy diet is, more expensive than an unhealthy one. The wide availability of cheap energy dense low-nutrient food is contributing to the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Foods which reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes such as vegetables, fresh fruit, whole grains and unsaturated fats need to be more affordable and more widely available.”

The following preventive measures can help prevent the onset of Type 2 diabetes in people.

  • Exercise more Exercise has various benefits including preventing weight gain, controlling blood sugar levels, and other conditions. A minimum of 30 minutes of physical activity every day is very beneficial.
  • Eat healthy A diet rich in whole grain, fruits, and vegetables is very good for the body. Fibrous food will ensure that you feel fuller for a longer period and prevent any cravings. Avoid processed and refined food as much as possible.
  • Limit your alcohol intake and quit smoking Too much alcohol leads to weight gain and can increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should limit drinks to two per day and women to one per day. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers and therefore, it is a good idea to quit this habit.
  • Understand your risk factors Doing so can help you in taking preventive measures at the earliest and avoid complications.

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