Emergency medical expenses of senior citizens to be borne by state Govt., says Uttarakhand High Court

Health Care No Comments

The Uttarakhand High Court has held that the cost of medical expenses of senior citizens in case of emergency is to be borne by the state government.

In a Public Interest Litigation titled as “Senior Citizen Welfare Organisation & another versus State of Uttarakhand & another” bearing Writ Petition (PIL) No. 52 of 2013, the Hon’ble Division Bench of the High Court of Uttarakhand, Nanital Bench while dealing with the petition which was filed for protecting the rights of the senior citizen as per the provisions of the Maintenance and Welfare of the Parents and Senior Citizens Act, 2007, the Hon’ble High Court has vide judgment dated 12.06.2018 held that the senior citizens in case of emergency shall be taken to the nearest hospital for treatment and the cost of conveyance shall be borne by the State Government including the medical expenditure as well as of ambulance.

The Hon’ble High Court vide judgment has issued various directions for protecting the rights of the senior citizens which are reproduced hereunder:

“13. Accordingly, in view of the observations/ discussions made above, the present petition is disposed of with the following mandatory directions:

The State Government is directed to establish old age home in each district of the State of Uttarakhand within a period of six months. It is made clear that it shall be open to the State Government to hire private accommodation, as a temporary measure.
The State Government is directed to make a scheme for management of old age homes within a period of eight weeks from today as per Section 19(2) of the Act.
The State Government is directed to ensure to provide sufficient number of beds for senior citizens in each Government hospital or hospitals funded by the State Government.
The State Government is further directed to ensure that all the senior citizens in the State of Uttarakhand are provided free treatment including blood test, CT scan, MRI and other tests at Govt. hospitals.
The respondent-State shall upgrade the facilities to be provided in old age homes from time to time including the strength of the inhabitants.
The State Government is also directed to give due publicity to the Maintenance and Welfare of Parents and Senior Citizens Act, 2007 in print media, electronic media including through Panchayati Raj institutions for the awareness of the enactment as per Section 21 of the Act, 2007.The State Government shall provide the facilities to the senior citizens as per the Rules.
The State Government shall provide separate accommodation for men and women including sufficient potable water, electric fans, coolers/ AC, separate kitchen, dining room, separate bathroom for disabled senior citizens.
The State Government is also directed to provide wheel chair, television, newspaper and books in old age homes.
The State Government is also directed to provide ramp railing to the senior citizens including telephone service.
The State Government is also directed to provide balanced nutritious food, two sets of clothes for summer and winters, linen, sufficient number of sweepers for maintaining hygiene and cleanliness in old age homes.
The senior citizens in case of emergency shall be taken to the nearest hospital for treatment. The cost of conveyance shall be borne by the State Government including the medical expenditure as well as of ambulance.
The Circle Officers of the respective area are directed to maintain vigil in and around the old age homes.
The State Government is directed to protect the life and property of the senior citizens as provided under Rule 20.

The Secretary, Welfare to the State of Uttarakhand shall be personally responsible to implement the orders and monitor the directions issued hereinabove.”

Dr KK Aggarwal

Padma Shri Awardee

Vice President CMAAO

Group Editor-in-Chief IJCP Publications

President Heart Care Foundation of India

Immediate Past National President IMA

Ban trans-fats in restaurants: HCFI

Health Care, Heart Care Foundation of India, Medicine No Comments

Consumption of these can cause weight gain, heart problems, and even diabetes

New Delhi, 20th June 2018: In a significant move, the Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) has written to the health ministry requesting a ban on the use of trans fats in the restaurants. This follows the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) ban of artificial trans fats from American restaurants and grocery store food items recently. The FDA deemed trans fats unsafe in 2015 and gave companies until June 18, 2018 to eliminate the ingredient.

Trans fats have been a staple in the tastiest junk foods for more than 100 years. The FDA ban applies to artificial trans fats, which are made chemically by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil (partially hydrogenated oil is also trans-fat). Trans fats increases the shelf life of packaged foods, and restaurants like to use it as oil for deep frying because it doesn’t need to be changed as often as other oils.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee, Dr K K Aggarwal, President, Heart Care Foundation of India, said, “The FDA’s move to provide an ultimatum for the ban of trans fats in American restaurants is a highly welcome one and should be replicated with immediate effect in India as well. The health effects of these are not unknown but consumption in various forms continues, particularly when it comes to eating outside food. Trans fats are a byproduct of the chemical reaction that turns liquid vegetable oil into solid margarine or shortening and that prevents liquid vegetable oils from turning rancid. Trans fats boost LDL as much as saturated fats do. They also lower protective HDL, rev up inflammation and increase the tendency for blood clots to form inside blood vessels.”

Trans fats are created by pumping hydrogen molecules into vegetable oils. This changes the chemical structure of the oil, turning it from a liquid into a solid. The process involves high pressure, hydrogen gas, and a metal catalyst – and the end-product is highly unsuitable for human consumption.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, who is also the Group Editor of IJCP, said, “Foods rich in trans fats tend to be high in added sugar and calories. Over time, these can pave way for weight gain and even Type 2 diabetes, not to mention heart problems. It is time to take a strong stand against their use in eateries outside considering the fact that many people eat in restaurants regularly in today’s day and age.”

Some tips from HCFI

· Choose foods lower in saturated fats, trans fats and cholesterol.

· Replace saturated and trans fats in your diet with mono- and polyunsaturated fats. These fats do not raise LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol levels and have health benefits when eaten in moderation. Sources of monounsaturated fats include olive and canola oils. Sources of polyunsaturated fats include soybean, corn, sunflower oils, and foods like nuts.

· Choose vegetable oils (except coconut and palm kernel oils) and soft margarines (liquid, tub, or spray) more often because the combined amount of saturated and trans fats is lower than the amount in solid shortenings, hard margarines, and animal fats, including butter.

· Most fish are lower in saturated fat than meat. Some fish, such as mackerel, sardines and salmon, contain omega–3 fatty acids that are being studied to determine if they offer protection against heart disease.

· Limit foods high in cholesterol such as liver and other organ meats, egg yolks and full–fat dairy products, like whole milk.

· Choose foods low in saturated fat such as fat free or 1% dairy products, lean meats, fish, skinless poultry, whole grain foods and fruit and vegetables.

Children with a gaming addiction will now be able to get free NHS treatment: Will Mediclaim follow?

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The World Health Organization (WHO) has listed gaming disorder as a disease in ICD 11, its latest International Classification of Diseases (ICD) released on Monday.

The ICD contains around 55 000 unique codes for injuries, diseases and causes of death.

The ICD-11 has defined gaming disorder as a pattern of gaming behavior (“digital-gaming” or “video-gaming”) characterized by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences.

For gaming disorder to be diagnosed, the behavior pattern must be of sufficient severity to result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning and would normally have been evident for at least 12 months.

ICD allows health professionals across the globe to share health information. It helps health workers and governments to be alert to disease trends. ICD is also used by health insurers whose reimbursements depend on ICD coding.

WHO will be notifying governments that theyll be expected to add gaming disorder to their public health systems. This means that those individuals diagnosed with ‘gaming disorder’ will now be entitled to be treated by the NHS.

Will Mediclaim follow suit?

Dr KK Aggarwal

Padma Shri AwardeeVice President CMAAOGroup Editor-in-Chief IJCP Publications

President Heart Care Foundation of India

Immediate Past National President IMA

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