A new treatment for anemia in adults with beta-thalassemia?

Health Care Comments Off

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved luspatercept-aamt (Reblozyl) for treatment of anemia in adult patients with beta thalassemia, also called “Cooley’s anemia, who require regular red blood cell transfusions.

Dose: The recommended starting dose is 1 mg/kg once every 3 weeks by subcutaneous injection.

Adverse effects: Headache, bone pain, arthralgia, fatigue, cough, abdominal pain, diarrhea and dizziness

Warning and precautions

  • Patients may experience hypertension while using the drug. Health care professionals are advised to monitor a patient’s blood pressure during treatment and to initiate anti-hypertensive treatment if necessary.
  • Patients who receive luspatercept-aamt should be monitored for thrombosis.
  • Health care professionals should tell females of reproductive age to use effective contraception during treatment with luspatercept-aamt.
  • Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not take luspatercept-aamt l because it may cause harm to a developing fetus or newborn baby.

(Source: US FDA)

Dr KK Aggarwal

Padma Shri Awardee

President Confederation of Medical Associations in Asia and Oceania (CMAAO)

Group Editor-in-Chief IJCP Publications

President Heart Care Foundation of India

Past National President IMA

Girl suspected to be suffering from dengue dies in Delhi

Health Care Comments Off

Rise in hematocrit along with rapid fall in platelets is the danger sign in dengue

A16-year-old girl suspected to be suffering from dengue died at a Delhi hospital. She was running fever for the last 8-10 days. She was a resident of a housing complex; more than 1500 families are residing in various towers of the housing complex. The National Buildings Construction Corporation (NBCC) is responsible for cleaning, sweeping, collecting garbage and carrying out anti-malarial and anti-larval activities at the complex.

Less than 1100 cases of dengue and no deaths due to the mosquito-borne disease have been reported so far this year in the city. Cases of malaria and Chikungunya have also decreased in Delhi. Of the total dengue cases, there were 787 in October, while in the same month 249 malaria cases were also recorded. 143 cases of Chikungunya have also been reported this year.

Last year, 2,798 dengue cases and four deaths were recorded by the SDMC. It had also reported 473 cases of malaria and 165 cases of Chikungunya.

In 2015, more than 15,000 dengue cases had been recorded and 60 people had died in the national capital.

Preventing death in dengue: Caveats

  • A dengue case may become serious when the fever is subsiding or has just subsided. This is the “critical phase”. This usually happens between 5-7 days of onset of illness. Severe dengue is a potentially fatal complication, due to plasma leaking, fluid accumulation, respiratory distress, severe bleeding, or organ impairment. Warning signs include: Severe abdominal pain, persistent vomiting, rapid breathing, bleeding gums, fatigue and restlessness.
  • The clinical marker is reduced pulse pressure, which is the difference between upper and lower blood pressure with acute fall in platelet count with simultaneous rapid rise in hematocrit value. Rise in hematocrit along with rapid fall in platelets is the danger sign and is indicative of impending severe dengue. More than the falling platelet count, it is the rapidity of fall in platelet count that is important.
  • If the difference between the upper and lower blood pressure is less than 20, rise in pulse by 20, rapid fall in platelets to less than 20, 000 and the hematocrit value is more than 50, suspect serious dengue, especially if the patient is experiencing acute weakness, start fluid replacement at 20 ml/kg/hour immediately before transferring him or her to the hospital

Dr KK Aggarwal

Padma Shri Awardee

President Confederation of Medical Associations in Asia and Oceania (CMAAO)

Group Editor-in-Chief IJCP Publications

President Heart Care Foundation of India

Past National President IMA

HCFI and RKGIT College jointly organize training on how to save a life in the event of choking for pharmacy students on World Diabetes Day

Health Care Comments Off

Guests at the event gave insights on managing diabetes and preventing complications to students and others present

Ghaziabad, 14th November 2019: The Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI), a leading national non-profit organization, committed to making India a healthier and disease-free nation, in association with the Raj Kumar Institute of Technology (Pharmacy division), Ghaziabad, recently organized a programme commemorating World Diabetes Day.

Dr K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India and CMAAO was the Chief Guest for the event and Shri Laxman Prasad from RKGIT was the Guest of Honor. The delegation from HCFI included Dr (Major) Prachi Garg, Mr Saurabh Aggarwal, Ms Poonam Gupta, Mr Deepak Verma, Mr Sanjeev Khanna, Mr Dheeraj Kumar, Ms Ritu Manjhi, Ms Vandana Rawat, Mr Ram Singh, Mr Daya Ram, Mr Himanshu and Ms Sabina.

During the event, all pharmacy students from RKGIT were trained on how to save a life in the event of choking. The guests present gave their valuable insights on various aspects related to diabetes and its management. Dr Monica Sachdeva, Ms Supriya, and Mr Akshat from RKGIT were also present at the event.

Speaking to the students, Dr KK Aggarwal, said, “The mantra to avert diabetes or even prevent the complications associated with the condition should be ‘meetha bolo, kadwa khao’. Diabetes is assuming epidemic proportions in India and the need of the hour is large-scale awareness on the condition. People should take proactive steps to follow a healthy lifestyle right from a young age.”

Adding his comments, Shri Laxman Prasad, said, “All students should be aware of how to save a life in case someone is choking. First aid is something that everyone should learn, and lifesaving techniques can come to the aid of someone who is suffering. As students of medicine, this should be your first responsibility.”

Dr (Major) Prachi Garg, added, “One of the major risk factors that can worsen the symptoms and outcomes of diabetes is oppressing one’s emotions. One should avoid taking undue stress and ensure that they stay calm and happy.”

HCFI regularly conducts several awareness programmes around the city and the event on World Diabetes Day was also a step towards educating students about other aspects of the condition.

Some tips to prevent diabetes from HCFI

  • A diet rich in whole grain, fruits, and vegetables is very good for the body. Fibrous food will ensure that you feel fuller for a longer period and prevent any cravings. Avoid processed and refined food as much as possible.
  • Limit your alcohol intake and quit smoking. Too much alcohol leads to weight gain and can increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should limit drinks to two per day and women to one per day. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers and therefore, it is a good idea to quit this habit.
  • Understand your risk factors as it can help you in taking preventive measures at the earliest and avoid complications.

« Previous Entries Next Entries »