HCFI and RKGIT College jointly organize training on how to save a life in the event of choking for pharmacy students on World Diabetes Day

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Guests at the event gave insights on managing diabetes and preventing complications to students and others present

Ghaziabad, 14th November 2019: The Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI), a leading national non-profit organization, committed to making India a healthier and disease-free nation, in association with the Raj Kumar Institute of Technology (Pharmacy division), Ghaziabad, recently organized a programme commemorating World Diabetes Day.

Dr K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India and CMAAO was the Chief Guest for the event and Shri Laxman Prasad from RKGIT was the Guest of Honor. The delegation from HCFI included Dr (Major) Prachi Garg, Mr Saurabh Aggarwal, Ms Poonam Gupta, Mr Deepak Verma, Mr Sanjeev Khanna, Mr Dheeraj Kumar, Ms Ritu Manjhi, Ms Vandana Rawat, Mr Ram Singh, Mr Daya Ram, Mr Himanshu and Ms Sabina.

During the event, all pharmacy students from RKGIT were trained on how to save a life in the event of choking. The guests present gave their valuable insights on various aspects related to diabetes and its management. Dr Monica Sachdeva, Ms Supriya, and Mr Akshat from RKGIT were also present at the event.

Speaking to the students, Dr KK Aggarwal, said, “The mantra to avert diabetes or even prevent the complications associated with the condition should be ‘meetha bolo, kadwa khao’. Diabetes is assuming epidemic proportions in India and the need of the hour is large-scale awareness on the condition. People should take proactive steps to follow a healthy lifestyle right from a young age.”

Adding his comments, Shri Laxman Prasad, said, “All students should be aware of how to save a life in case someone is choking. First aid is something that everyone should learn, and lifesaving techniques can come to the aid of someone who is suffering. As students of medicine, this should be your first responsibility.”

Dr (Major) Prachi Garg, added, “One of the major risk factors that can worsen the symptoms and outcomes of diabetes is oppressing one’s emotions. One should avoid taking undue stress and ensure that they stay calm and happy.”

HCFI regularly conducts several awareness programmes around the city and the event on World Diabetes Day was also a step towards educating students about other aspects of the condition.

Some tips to prevent diabetes from HCFI

  • A diet rich in whole grain, fruits, and vegetables is very good for the body. Fibrous food will ensure that you feel fuller for a longer period and prevent any cravings. Avoid processed and refined food as much as possible.
  • Limit your alcohol intake and quit smoking. Too much alcohol leads to weight gain and can increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should limit drinks to two per day and women to one per day. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers and therefore, it is a good idea to quit this habit.
  • Understand your risk factors as it can help you in taking preventive measures at the earliest and avoid complications.

Both active and passive smoking are major risk factors for hypertension: HCFI

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High blood pressure can lead to several health complications and even premature death

New Delhi, 15th May 2019: Recent research has suggested that passive smoking at home or work is linked with a 13% increased risk of hypertension. Living with a smoker after age 20 may be associated with a 15% greater risk. Exposure to passive smoking can lead to hypertension over time with men and women equally affected.

High blood pressure accounts for almost 10 million deaths around the world. The need of the hour is to raise awareness on the fact that smoking is a leading risk factor for this condition and therefore, it is imperative to quit the habit at the earliest. There is a need to stay away from secondhand smoke, and not just reduce exposure, to prevent hypertension.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee, Dr KK Aggarwal, President, HCFI, said, “Smoking can raise blood pressure by as much as 10 mmHg especially in susceptible individuals. The effect is most prominent with the first cigarette of the day in habitual smokers. High blood pressure imposes an up-front burden in people who know they have it and who are working to control it. Apart from adding to health woes, it alters what you eat and how active you are, since lifestyle changes are important in keeping blood pressure under check. Some people need medication and may need to take one or more pills a day, which can prove costly. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to heart attack or stroke, aneurysm, heart failure, organ malfunction, vision loss, metabolic syndrome and memory problems.”

Hypertension is defined as a repeatedly elevated blood pressure exceeding 140/90 mmHg. It generally doesn’t cause any outward signs or symptoms but silently damages blood vessels, and other organs.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, who is also the Group Editor-in-Chief of IJCP, said, “It is recommend for everyone to get an annual checkup after the age of 30 even in the absence of a no family history of hypertension, diabetes or heart disease.

The old saying ‘prevention is better than cure’ holds true today more than ever. To live above the age of 80, one needs to maintain ideal health parameters and lead an ideal lifestyle. The HCFI Formula of 80 describes certain preventive measures that can be undertaken.

  • Keep your lower BP, fasting sugar, waist circumference, resting heart rate and low- density lipoprotein LDL or the ‘bad’ cholesterol levels all <80.
  • Walk 80 minutes a day; brisk walk 80 minutes a week with a speed of 80 (at least) steps per minute.
  • Keep kidney and lung function more than 80%.
  • Eat less; not more than 80 g/80 mL of caloric food in one meal. Do not eat refined carbohydrates 80 days in a year.
  • Take vitamin D through sunlight 80 days in a year.
  • Do not drink alcohol and if you drink, take less than 80 mL of whiskey (80 proof 40% alcohol) in a day or less than 80 g (240 mL) of whiskey in a week.
  • Do 80 cycles of Pranayama in a day with a speed of 4 breaths/minute.
  • Do not smoke or be ready for heart surgery costing Rs. 80,000/-. Donate blood 80 times in a lifetime.
  • Avoid exposure to >80 dB of noise pollution.

India faces the dual burden of obesity and malnutrition: HCFI

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Increasing obesity levels in rural India a cause for concern

New Delhi, 10th May 2019: Obesity is increasing more rapidly in the world’s rural areas than in cities, according to a study of global trends in body-mass index (BMI). The study, published in the journal Nature, analysed the height and weight data of over 112 million adults across urban and rural areas of 200 countries and territories between 1985 and 2017. The prevalence of obesity in India is increasing and ranges from 8% to 38% in rural and 13% to 50% in urban areas.

Rural areas in low- and middle-income countries have seen shifts towards higher incomes, better infrastructure, more mechanized agriculture and increased car use. These factors not only bring numerous health benefits, but also lead to lower energy expenditure and to more spending on food, which can be processed and low-quality when sufficient regulations are not in place. The need of the hour is large-scale awareness on the importance of healthy eating patterns.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee, Dr KK Aggarwal, President, HCFI, said, “Obesity is the mother of conditions such as diabetes and heart problems. India faces a dual burden. On the one hand is malnutrition and on the other is obesity. What makes obesity in India different from the rest of the world is that in our country, it is marked by the ‘Thin-Fat Indian Phenotype’. This means that there is a higher proportion of people with body fat, abdominal obesity, and visceral fat, in comparison with Caucasian and European counterparts. Hence, world obesity generally reported in terms of waist circumference, and a BMI beyond 30, significantly underestimates the prevalence of obesity in India. Indian obesity needs to be estimated according to a lower threshold of BMI 25. Additionally, even a normal BMI of up to 23, might show higher instances of isolated abdominal obesity.”

Two primary culprits of obesity include a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy eating patterns. The consumption of processed food has increased manifold. This, combined with untimely working patterns and lack of physical activity, make the situation worse.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, who is also the Group Editor-in-Chief of IJCP, said, “The traditional Indian diet is rich in carbohydrates. People consume large quantities of rice, rotis, and even bread. Apart from this, there is widespread availability of fried and unhealthy fast food today, which are all contributors to empty calories in the diet. Indians are caught amidst all this and therefore, the increase in the prevalence of obesity does not come as a surprise.”

Some tips from HCFI

  • The key to weight loss is reducing how many calories you take in.
  • The concept of energy density can help you satisfy your hunger with fewer calories.
  • To make your overall diet healthier, eat more plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole-grain carbohydrates.
  • Make exercise an important part of your daily routine. Start slow and increase the duration as you go along.

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