Ansal University partners with Heart Care Foundation of India

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Press Release

Delhi, July 6, 2019:  Ansal University, India’s leading private university, signed a memorandum of understanding with the Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI), a leading national non-profit organization committed to making India a healthier and disease-free nation, on Doctor’s Day (1 July 2019).

The partnership is intended towards setting up a Centre of Excellence at Ansal University campus to impart students training in advance areas relevant to emerging healthcare industry.

The MoU was signed by the Registrar, Ansal University and Padma Shri Awardee, Dr K K Aggarwal, President, HCFI.

Through this specialized centre, the University aims to introduce new healthcare and related courses for its students and make use of HCFI’s expertise in various aspects. Since its inception in 1986, the HCFI has been using consumer-based entertainment modules to impart health education and increase awareness about preventive health amongst people. In addition to this, the NGO conducts programmes and camps to train people on the technique of hands-only CPR through its CPR 10 mantra for revival after a sudden cardiac arrest. HCFI currently holds three Limca Book of World Records for the maximum number of people trained in hands-only CPR in one go.

“This association with HCFI is a step towards a better, vibrant future for our students. HCFI is an entity known for its exemplary work in the field of heart care and medicine and with their help, we will be able to hone potential doctors and professionals in the field of medicare. Our aim is to enhance the future of the healthcare sector which is on its path to achieve an exponential growth in this area in our country”, said Prof (Dr) Raj Singh, Vice Chancellor, Ansal University.

“We are happy to be associated with the Ansal University for a one-of-its-kind Centre of Excellence aimed at developing new courses and training students in techniques like CPR. It will not only help them understand the basics of these essential techniques and develop expertise in them but also set a new standard in the delivery of healthcare education”, said Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India.

Through the Centre of Excellence, the HCFI will develop short-term courses on CPR, first-aid, etc. which will either be new or integrated with existing ones. HCFI will also tie-up with UNESCO for developing a Bio Ethics Course apart from others focusing on health educators, breeding checkers and multipurpose educators. The new-formed alliance is aimed towards setting a benchmark in the medical industry and raising the bar of fine-quality education.

About Ansal University and Healthcare Foundation of India:-

Ansal University

Ansal University was established in 2012 under the Haryana Private Universities Act 2006.Located in the heart of Gurgaon, India’s largest hub of National and Fortune 500 companies, it has eight schools offering programmes in Architecture, Design, Law, Management, Hospitality, Engineering, Health Sciences and Planning & Development.Ansal University has been awarded the National Education Excellence award “Best Private University in Northern India 2017” along with “CSR Excellence in Education” award for 2 consecutive years i.e. 2017 and 2018. Sushant School of Art and Architecture at Ansal University is the flagship school which started in 1989 and has been consistently ranked No. 1 Private Architecture School in India by Outlook Magazine.

Healthcare Foundation Of India

Heart Foundation Of India was Founded in 1986 as a National Charitable Trust with the basic objective of creating awareness about all aspects of health for people from all walks of life incorporating all pathies incorporating low cost infotainment modules under one roof. Amongst other key achievements, HCFI is the only NGO in the country on whose community based health awareness events, Government of India has released two commemorative national stamps ( Rs one in 1991 on run for the heart and Rs 6.50 in 1993 on heart care festival- first perfect health mela). Government of Rajisthan also released one Cancellation stamp ( February 2012 during first mega health camp at Ajmer)

Hypertension during pregnancy can be detrimental to mother and baby: HCFI

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Awareness must be raised on preventive measures during and after pregnancy

New Delhi, 17th May 2019: National studies show that prevalence of hypertension among the Indian urban middle-class men and women is 32% and 30%, respectively. Factors such as family history, age, gender, diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, obesity, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical inactivity, and stress increase the risk. Despite this, not many people are aware of the condition or do not take preventive measures at an early stage.

Research indicates that women with high blood pressure, especially during pregnancy, are at a two-fold risk of heart failure post-delivery. The need of the hour is to monitor women before discharge and after giving birth, through the postpartum period.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee, Dr KK Aggarwal, President, HCFI, said, “Hypertension during pregnancy can be detrimental to both the mother and the baby. Women with high blood pressure can develop resistance in their blood vessels. This hampers the flow of blood throughout the body including the placenta and uterus leading to problems with fetal growth. It can also cause premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus, disruption in the flow of oxygen to the placenta leading to delayed fetal growth, or in worst cases even stillbirth. If not closely monitored before, during, and after childbirth, it may become a major cause of heart problems including heart failure in such women. Some other fatal repercussions of high blood pressure include pre-term birth, seizures, or even death of the mother and the baby.”

Heart failure, or peripartum cardiomyopathy, can occur up to five months after giving birth. Some symptoms of this condition include tiredness, shortness of breath, swollen ankles, swollen neck veins and feeling of missed heartbeats or palpitations.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, who is also the Group Editor-in-Chief of IJCP, said, “It is imperative for women diagnosed with hypertension to remain hospitalized for some time. Although the damage caused by peripartum cardiomyopathy to the heart is irreversible, it can still function with the help of some medications and treatment. In severe cases, a heart transplant may be recommended. Women must take steps to bring blood pressure under control from the time they wish to conceive, through certain lifestyle changes.”

Drugs such as beta-blockers can help reduce blood pressure. Diuretics are another class of drugs that help lower blood pressure by removing excess water and salt from the body. Some other treatment options include coronary artery bypass surgery and implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

Some tips to control and prevent high blood pressure from HCFI

  • Monitor your blood pressure before, during, and after pregnancy. Consume less salt as a high intake can raise blood pressure.
  • Be physically active even during pregnancy. Sedentary women are likely to gain more weight than required, which can increase the risk of hypertension.
  • Make sure you are not taking medication that can raise blood pressure levels. If you already have high blood pressure, talk to your doctor about the steps that need to be followed.
  • Get regular prenatal checkups.
  • Tobacco and alcohol are not safe during pregnancy and must be avoided.

Both active and passive smoking are major risk factors for hypertension: HCFI

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High blood pressure can lead to several health complications and even premature death

New Delhi, 15th May 2019: Recent research has suggested that passive smoking at home or work is linked with a 13% increased risk of hypertension. Living with a smoker after age 20 may be associated with a 15% greater risk. Exposure to passive smoking can lead to hypertension over time with men and women equally affected.

High blood pressure accounts for almost 10 million deaths around the world. The need of the hour is to raise awareness on the fact that smoking is a leading risk factor for this condition and therefore, it is imperative to quit the habit at the earliest. There is a need to stay away from secondhand smoke, and not just reduce exposure, to prevent hypertension.

Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee, Dr KK Aggarwal, President, HCFI, said, “Smoking can raise blood pressure by as much as 10 mmHg especially in susceptible individuals. The effect is most prominent with the first cigarette of the day in habitual smokers. High blood pressure imposes an up-front burden in people who know they have it and who are working to control it. Apart from adding to health woes, it alters what you eat and how active you are, since lifestyle changes are important in keeping blood pressure under check. Some people need medication and may need to take one or more pills a day, which can prove costly. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to heart attack or stroke, aneurysm, heart failure, organ malfunction, vision loss, metabolic syndrome and memory problems.”

Hypertension is defined as a repeatedly elevated blood pressure exceeding 140/90 mmHg. It generally doesn’t cause any outward signs or symptoms but silently damages blood vessels, and other organs.

Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, who is also the Group Editor-in-Chief of IJCP, said, “It is recommend for everyone to get an annual checkup after the age of 30 even in the absence of a no family history of hypertension, diabetes or heart disease.

The old saying ‘prevention is better than cure’ holds true today more than ever. To live above the age of 80, one needs to maintain ideal health parameters and lead an ideal lifestyle. The HCFI Formula of 80 describes certain preventive measures that can be undertaken.

  • Keep your lower BP, fasting sugar, waist circumference, resting heart rate and low- density lipoprotein LDL or the ‘bad’ cholesterol levels all <80.
  • Walk 80 minutes a day; brisk walk 80 minutes a week with a speed of 80 (at least) steps per minute.
  • Keep kidney and lung function more than 80%.
  • Eat less; not more than 80 g/80 mL of caloric food in one meal. Do not eat refined carbohydrates 80 days in a year.
  • Take vitamin D through sunlight 80 days in a year.
  • Do not drink alcohol and if you drink, take less than 80 mL of whiskey (80 proof 40% alcohol) in a day or less than 80 g (240 mL) of whiskey in a week.
  • Do 80 cycles of Pranayama in a day with a speed of 4 breaths/minute.
  • Do not smoke or be ready for heart surgery costing Rs. 80,000/-. Donate blood 80 times in a lifetime.
  • Avoid exposure to >80 dB of noise pollution.

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